American and European Motor Vehicle Parts Suppliers call for Free Trade and Harmonized Standards


 WASHINGTON, D.C., and BRUSSELS — In a joint statement released today, the American-based Motor & Equipment Manufacturers Association (MEMA) and the European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA) voiced support for free and fair trade, access to raw and finished materials, and harmonized safety and environmental standards that will allow motor vehicle parts manufacturers to remain competitive in a global marketplace. The statement is seen to underline the positive impact of international trade, in times of rising concerns about globalization and protectionism.

“Suppliers need open, free and fair trade for access to raw materials, finished components, and customers,” the statement says. “Illegal regional or national subsidies on goods or production, restrictive non-tariff barriers to trade (including testing and marking requirements), and lack of participation in the world market limits both the domestic and global competitiveness of all suppliers.”

MEMA and CLEPA also call for trade policies that address trade distortions and preserve open markets while maintaining and improving existing agreements. The two trade organizations also advocate for mutual recognition of vehicle safety and emissions regulations in the U.S. and the EU, as well as to work within the framework of the United Nations’ World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (WP.29) to establish safety and environmental global technical regulations. Harmonized standards reduce costs while promoting advancements in new and innovative technologies, the statement says.

“These actions serve to protect the international rule of law and strengthen the opportunities for all participants to thrive in a fair and free global marketplace,” the statement says. “The international motor vehicle parts supplier industry is leading the way in technological advances that will enable safer, smarter, and more efficient vehicles,” said MEMA President and CEO Steve Handschuh. “We are at the cusp of the biggest technological changes in 100 years. It is critical that free and open trade facilitate our ability to innovate and compete in the global marketplace.”

“Our sector operates in a highly integrated supply chain, with components often crossing borders, multiple times, to become a finished part or end up in a vehicle,” said CLEPA Secretary General Sigrid de Vries. “Automotive suppliers need easy and fair access to foreign markets to evolve competitively, underpinning growth and employment around the world.”

About MEMA and CLEPA

MEMA represents 1,000 vehicle suppliers that manufacture and remanufacture new original equipment and aftermarket components and systems for use in passenger cars and heavy trucks. MEMA represents its members through four divisions: Automotive Aftermarket Suppliers Association (AASA); Heavy Duty Manufacturers Association (HDMA); Motor & Equipment Remanufacturers Association (MERA); and, Original Equipment Suppliers Association (OESA). Suppliers are the largest employer of manufacturing jobs in the United States, directly employing over 871,000 Americans with a total employment impact of 4.26 million jobs and an economic contribution of $435 billion (2.4% of U.S. GDP). Visit http://www.mema.org

CLEPA is the European Association of Automotive Suppliers. Over 120 of the world’s most prominent suppliers for car parts, systems and modules and 23 National trade associations and European sector associations are members of CLEPA, representing more than 3,000 companies and covering all products and services within the automotive supply chain. Based in Brussels, Belgium, CLEPA is recognised as the natural discussion partner by the European Institutions, United Nations and fellow associations (ACEA, JAMA, MEMA, etc.). Visit http://www.clepa.eu

Christopher Macgowan

@chrismacgowan

Advertisements
This entry was posted in automotive and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s